Guidance


Guidance for Authors

If you have an article or report you wish to be considered for publication in the PMG online journal, please click on SUBMIT A JOURNAL ARTICLE in the left hand menu, and complete the form.  You will be required to upload your submission in Word format; if this presents a problem, please contact [email protected]

The PMG editorial team reserves the right to amend articles during proofing, and will consult contributors where necessary. 

Below you'll find information about acronyms/jargon, confidentiality, endorsements and referencingplease read carefully.

 

1. ACRONYMS/JARGON

Not all readers will be specialists, so remember to write the full terminology the first time you use it; for example 'allied health professional (AHP)'.
Try to avoid jargon, or explain it if you can't avoid it!

 

2. CONFIDENTIALITY POLICY

Authors should anonymise information about clients/patients as much as possible.  However, if it is still possible to identify a client from the information or images submitted for publication, written consent will be required.  

We are always keen to use pictures taken and provided by the author where possible. Please let us know who or what the picture is showing.

Please do not scan or download images from third party sources for submission, as we will not be able to use them due to copyright issues.


3. ENDORSEMENTS

If any article submitted endorses a particular product or company, PMG will not publish it.  

 

4. REFERENCING

PMG uses the Harvard style for referencing.  Fortunately, there are helpful tools to help with this, for example in Word: click on the References tab, then select Harvard from the Style drop-down; alternatively, try http://www.neilstoolbox.com/articles/harvard-reference-generator.htm 

Remember to include in-text citations, e.g. (Cousins & Clarke, 2006) after the sentence or phrase the citation supports. If more than 2 authors, the in-text citation would be (Cousins, et al., 2006)

The references should then be listed alphabetically at the end of your article.

If you prefer not to use the above tools for generating references, please follow the instructions below carefully:

Each reference needs to contain the following individual elements in the order shown: 
Author. (Date) Title. Publisher, Place of publication.

Examples

Book:
Author’s Surname, Initial., Year of publication. Title. Edition (if not the first). Publisher: Place of publication.

Pope, P., 2007. Severe and Complex Neurological Disability. London: Butterworth-Heinemann Elsevier.

Book chapter or contribution:
Chapter author’s Surname, Initial., Year of publication. Title of the chapter. In: Initials. Surname, (of book author or editor, in which case follow by ed. or eds.). Title of the book. Publisher: Place of publication.

Lewis, R., 2003. Physiotherapy in rheumatology. In: S. Porter, ed. Tidy's physiotherapy. Edinburgh: Butterworth Heinemann, pp. 138-140.

Journal article: (use commonly accepted abbreviations of journal titles, e.g. JAMA or BMJ)
Author’s Surname, Initial., Year of publication. Title of the article. Title of the journal, Volume number (issue number), page numbers of the article.

Cousins, S. & Clarke, R., 2006. Improvements to matrix seating: technical and clinical developments. Technology and disability, 18(3), pp. 9-13.

Internet:
Author’s Surname, Initial., or Organisation. Date last updated. Title. (Online) Publisher and place of publication if applicable. Available at: URL (Accessed date).

Robertson, V., 2001. Guidelines for the clinical use of electrophysical agents. [Online]. Available at: http://apa.advsol.com.au. [Accessed 04 March 2008].